Your First Assignment:

  • Practice stream of consciousness writing for about two or three minutes.

 

You are welcome to write longer if you feel called, but often we can find it overwhelming to begin with lengthy stretches of time. Short and sweet is a great tip for staying in the game until a habit is formed.





 

There. It’s all there in a big muddled pile ready to be composed or recycled. (Maybe there’s something you can use, maybe not. Put the unused away for later and let it break down subconsciously.)

Do you now feel some dust has been cleared?

Let's continue...

 

 
 

Your Second Assignment:

Now let's keep going with the stream of consciousness concept, but this time we are going to ponder our introductory question:

What makes a poet?

  • What makes a poet? Write down your answer in a stream of conscious way for 5 minutes.

Example:

“What makes a poet? Here are my thoughts: A gift to the soul at birth. Long hours of contemplation. A receptive, childlike heart. Years of life experience. Desire, deep longing. Wounds, regrets. Hope, tears. Wisdom, foolishness. Bright light and utter darkness. Chaos, creativity. Order, truth. Music and silence. Ambition and abandon. Heaven and earth. Stillness and movement.”
 

  • Next, we are going to arrange the lines into stanzas.

    Start with "What makes a poet?" as your first line and your last line. Leave space for two lines in between. We will follow this pattern: ABCA.

    Select and pair a few of your favorite sentences from the stream of consciousness writing. Then arrange two at a time between the first and last sentence. (You do not have to rhyme the middle two lines, but you may if you wish.)
     

Example:

What makes a poet?

A gift to the soul at birth.

Long hours of contemplation.

What makes a poet?

 

What makes a poet?

A receptive, childlike heart.

Years of life experience.

What makes a poet?

 

What makes a poet?

Desire, deep longing.

Wounds, regrets.

What makes a poet?

Read the rest here...







Note: You don't have to make your poem as long as the example. Try starting with two stanzas. If the inclination or inspiration strikes, add more.

 

 

Your One Word Prompt:

- Space -